Comic Con 2014 PowWow

When I was a camp counselor we would gather with our cabins at the end of the day and go around the circle doing a powwow. The “pow” would be the low point in the day, something that was frustrating or disappointing, and the “wow” would be the best part of the day.

This year I managed to snag a badge for Comic Con. I was there for Saturday and Sunday and probably could have planned things out a little more in advance. Like I did with VidCon, I’m going to PowWow each day I was at the convention.

DAY 1
POW: Meeting so many new people at once. Another friend of mine who goes every year introduced me to her rather large group of friends. It was great to have some people to hang out with, but it was also a bit much for my introverted side. I kind of crashed from too much social interaction while we were waiting in line for dinner. Whoops.
WOW: Feeling like I finally got a sense for how the expo hall was set up. Last year I was only there for one day and I mostly walked around in a daze because I was so overwhelmed by it all. This year I managed to find a bit of order in the madness, which was quite calming.

DAY 2
POW: The realization (even though I knew it going in) that I wasn’t going to get to do some of the things I was really excited about. The lines were too long. The crowds were too much. And I was too tired. I definitely git a brick wall of tired on day two around 2:30. I was about to go into another panel when I realized that I should probably start my mini road trip before I got tired enough to fall asleep whist driving.
WOW: The Women of Marvel panel was definitely a highlight. I loved hearing about the female driven titles that Marvel has and the women who write/draw/color/manage/produce them. I’m so excited for the future of women in comics both as creators and creatives as well as the female characters that we see and will be seeing in the future.

All told it was an exhausting weekend, but I’m very glad I went. I am honored to be even a small part in the industry that puts these things out into the world. I’m excited that Comic Con is a thing I go to now, and will continue to be going forward. Every year I learn more and I’m excited to be learning and growing into this industry.

If you’re interested in seeing some of these thoughts in video form, let me direct you to this week’s YouTube video. And while you’re over there maybe subscribe to see more of my videos? I’ve very much appreciate it.

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VidCon PowWow

When I was a camp counselor we would gather with our cabins at the end of the day and go around the circle doing a powwow. The “pow” would be the low point in the day, something that was frustrating or disappointing, and the “wow” would be the best part of the day.

In an effort to organize my thoughts from VidCon in a way that tries to show that I had a fantastic time, but also recognize some of the “pow”s of the event, I’m going to go back to my roots and powwow my VidCon experiene.

DAY 1
POW: I was really frustrated with the availability on Thursday. It was “Industry Day”, which is a great thing to focus on, but as someone who was mostly attending VidCon for the panels it was annoying that there wasn’t much to do on the first day.
WOW: Since I had so much time on my hands, I signed up to get a free manicure from the HLN booth. While I waited for it I met some pretty fun girls, one of whom is an LA local and I’m hoping will become a friend.
I also had a great time wandering the expo hall and meeting a few of my favorite YouTubers by happenstance which was lovely.

DAY 2
POW: This was the beginning of #linecon. While I was able to get into all the panels I wanted, I know that was not the case for everyone. I think that if they learn from this year and have a better system in place next year a lot of nerves and frustrations could be saved. Having tickets for signings and knowing about where in the line to at least tell people that they probably wont make it in would go a long way.
WOW: I went to so many panels on Friday and took lots of notes. I love the feel of learning that I got from being surrounded by other people who are also interested in creating online video. Such an inspirational feeling.

DAY 3
POW: More lines today. Specifically getting into the convention center was a nightmare on Saturday morning. Security people were contradicting each other and I saw one threaten to take people’s badges away. Both sides need to come in with an understanding that this is going to take some time. Clear communication would have been a huge step in the right direction on this one.
WOW: Saturday I got to meet one of my favorite YouTubers, and wound up meeting a bunch of people whilst waiting for a party that I never did manage to get into. It was great to connect with some new people, especially since I had come by myself.
I’ll also say that a favorite part about Saturday was that I finally mustered up the courage to bring my long board after debating it all weekend. It was fun to have that transportation, it sparked a few conversations, and was just generally useful.

Overall, I had a great weekend and am definitely interested in going again next year. Maybe with an industry badge? That my employer pays for? #wishfulthinking

My Year in Television 2013

As we near the end of the year I like to reflect on all the things I watched over the course of the year.  Warning: this is a LOOOONG post.  I watch a lot of TV.  I find that it’s good for me to keep track of things and when I’ve watched them, but just know that it’s kind of a lot.

I spent most of January and February at home in San Francisco, and took over the DVR as much as I could. I continued watching Elementary and Once Upon A Time, as well as being supremely excited about Community‘s return in February.

There are a handful of shows that overlap between what I like to watch and what my parents watch. We would watch Downton Abbey the night it aired, and we began House of Cards together. I also watched some of the shows my parents watched such as American Pickers and American Restoration. I left would leave whenever they started up Dog the Bounty Hunter. I have to draw the line somewhere.

During the day I would watch DVDs and Netflix. I finished Band of Brothers and re-watched Luther to prepare for my semester. I watched Leverage episodes as in order as I could find them. I wrote about Angel on the blog and got really into web series. The Lizzie Bennet Diaries and a handful of others.

In March I moved to LA in a strange housing situation, and set all my usual recordings. I watched Doctor Who and saw a few episodes of Orphan Black that were fantastic. I wrote a spec of Luther that was the most complete script I’ve ever written. I’m proud of it, but I’m not sure it’s something that I’ll be able to use in the future.

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I spent most of April waiting for a phone call that never came. I watched documentaries on Netflix and rented DVDs from the library. Most notably I rented Roots and got through at least half of the series. In finished House of Cards and joined the rest of those who finished but didn’t want to spoil anyone else. With no word from school and no reason to stay in my weird housing set up I went back to San Francisco at the end of the month.

At home I dove back into my old routine of watching TV with my parents. I got back into shows that I had taken a long break on. I returned to my first television love, CSI and started watching Major Crimes when it returned in June. When I watched by myself I watched episode after episode of The Good Guys, finishing the entire series in record time.

June also saw the release of Much Ado About Nothing, which I first saw at the San Francisco International Film Festival. I know it’s technically not TV, but anything Joss Whedon feels TV-esque to me, and the cast is full of my favorite Whedon TV people, so I’m going to say it half-counts. Also half counting would be web series. I’m never quite sure where to put them, but over the summer I watched Welcome to Sanditon and An Autobiography of Jane Eyre.

In July I returned to LA just in time to start my summer semester in LA. I was a bit slow to set up internet access and TV, but when I finally did I pulled together all the recordings I could ever want. In between classes I watched Major Crimes, King and Maxwell, Hell’s Kitchen, MasterChef, and Camp. I happened upon a Blue Ray of The Newsroom and watched the entire first season quickly in order to prepare for season two which happened to fall within my HBO free trial.

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Through my class, I found myself at San Diego Comic Con without much of a plan at all. I was woefully under prepared, but managed to make the best I could of the one day I had. I wandered the expo hall in awe and waited in line to see the Once Upon A Time pirate ship. I went to a panel for Husbands, the web series I was a PA for last year and got a chance to talk with a few of the people I had connected with there. All in all a good, if a little overwhelming, day.

As the summer ended I said good-bye to all my summer favorites, and geared up for premiere season. While a friend of mine was in town we went to see a taping of Mom, a new show because we both love Allison Janney. It was fun to be in the audience (I think it was the 4th episode), but neither of us fell in love with the show. Certainly something I would do again, and a great idea for people who are visiting from out of town.

In September I started online classes and internships and a whole slew of new shows. I watched or recorded everything. NCIS, Elementary, CSI, Parks and Rec, The Middle, Modern Family, Once Upon A Time, The Good Wife, and The Mentalist on the returning side. I started watching Agents of SHIELD, Once Upon A Time in Wonderland, Trophy Wife, and The Crazy Ones of new shows. I’ve stuck with most of these to varying degrees. While all of the ones listed are still being recorded, there are a few I’m woefully behind on.


There were two shows that weren’t even on my radar at the beginning of the season, but I wound up recording on a whim and then LOVING. The first is Sleepy Hollow, which I recorded because it was mentioned at one of my internships and wound up completely blowing me away. Now that I look back I vaguely remember seeing some Sleepy Hollow things at Comic Con, but think that it wouldn’t be for me. WRONG! I also wound up recording Brooklyn Nine-Nine because I was recording Dads. While I’m not a fan of Dads, I love Brooklyn Nine-Nine.

As the semester got started I returned to Leverage and started Orange is the New Black. I watched movies and TV pilots for my internships and fell behind on a lot of current TV. November brought on the 300th episode of CSI, and the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary special. Thanksgiving rolled right into December and the live Sound of Music production. I have mixed feelings on the event, but do hope that the fantastic ratings will encourage networks to do similar things in the future.

As the year comes to an end I will be watching the Bonnie and Clyde mini-series, and tuning in for the mid-season finales of the shows listed above. I’ve finally caught up on a few and will continue to watch as the new year begins. While TV is on a break, I’ll be finishing shows that I can catch on Netflix including Leverage and Orange is the New Black.

This year has been full of great TV shows, and I’m excited for the year to come. What shows did you watch this year? Any favorites I’m missing?

Adaptions

One of the questions that comes out of the Superheroes discussion from a few weeks ago is the question of adaptions. Most superhero TV shows or movies are adaptions from comic books or graphic novels. Some from straight novels.

Studios and executives (people who fund moves and TV shows) LOVE adaptions. Something that is being adapted from something else will have a built in audience: the people who watched/read/followed the original material. Those people will come out and see a movie or tune in every week for a TV show because they’re already invested. This is especially true with direct interpretations.

There are two type of adaptions: the more obvious and “normal” is the direct adaption, where they take what’s on the page and put it on the screen. The more removed is what I call a “loose” adaption. The first will be pretty true to the original while the later will often can mix it up and be a little different.

Direct adaption stories will lock in the hard core fans. You are guaranteed a decent sized audience with a direct adaption… if you can pull it off. The hard part of direct adaptation is that if things are too different from what the fans had been thinking of then there will be push back. Talk of people ruining the original story. Some of this will happen regardless, but sometimes if the control room doesn’t look exactly the same or better than the fans imagined it in their heads… you could be feeling the back end of some serious hate.

With a direct translation the creators live and die by how accurately they portray the original source material. And even if it’s pretty close, sometimes it’s not enough. At the same time there’s fear of looking too much like the old material and if that material is culturally outdated or morally suspect to today’s society it can lead to calamity. So sometimes you just change it all.

The changing everything mind-frame leads to a loose adaption. This is something where we skip a generation and follow our main character’s son or daughter. Or where we take a side character and give them their own story entirely. Parallel to, and occasionally intersecting with, the original story, but able to stand on it’s own. Or when we take the characters and story from an older novel and put them in modern times.

A lot of times a loose interpretation can be more accessible to an audience who isn’t familiar with the source material. It allows for more wiggle room as you redefine characters we know and introduce us to new ones. Settings and relationships can feel more fresh in a loose adaption, and the re-introduction can be a great way for new viewers to access old material.

Of course this is not to say that one type of adaption is better than the other.  Only that the two are different, and it’s good to be aware of the differences. What are your favorite adaptions? Is it a loose adaption or a direct adaption?

 

Summer Break

summer break

No, not the traditional time off from school given to students in academia. I’m talking about the new web series that’s started up a few weeks ago. It follows 8 recent high school grads as they are spending their last summer together. Summer Break is a docu-reality done in real time with the “characters” tweeting, instagraming, and vineing, and the YouTube summaries popping up a day later.

I am fascinated by this show. The idea of “watching” (or I suppose more accurately following) things happening in real time is a true testament to how far technology has come. While with most social media integration the social media aspect comes after production, this show is doing the opposite. It’s allowing social media to determine what gets put in the final cut of the show.

Personally, I’m only a passive viewer. I subscribe to the YouTube channel, but only watch a few of the torrent of videos that are uploaded. It’s fascinating in it’s newness. Like a frog in a jar that I’ve put on my shelf and every once and a while I’ll pull it down and poke at it with a stick. I don’t think I’m quite the target market, but it’s wildly entertaining nonetheless.

The biggest question this raises for me is weather this form of story telling will catch on. Clearly it’s made for reality TV. But could it be adapted to scripted format? (Lizzie Bennett Diaries anyone?) Is it successful enough for advertisers to consider it marketable? How would advertisements work on a show like this?

So many questions and so few answers, but I suppose that only time will tell.

If you’re interested, you can check out their YouTube channel HERE, and their twitter account HERE.  I’m not linking to each individual’s Twitter/Insta/whatnot, it would be too much, but you can find them through these links.

The New World of YouTube

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As the market for web content grows, the offerings grow even faster. The top destination for web content is quite clearly YouTube. While typically media content is scripted, shoot, edited, and then sent out to consumers via movie theaters or television airwaves; YouTube works under a completely different premise letting the viewers also be the creators of content (see my explanation of how different types of content make money for their creators here).

Unlike movie, television, and some web content competition, YouTube is free to creators and viewers, and also available upon viewer demand. Wherever you want to watch a YouTube video, you can. There is very little filter of content, allowing for a great diversity of video topics, production, origin, and length. All together this content, made by amateurs and professionals alike, has grown into a company estimated to be worth $45 billion (source).

The question that arises when YouTube makes money from the content shared on their site is not weather they are allowed to make money, but how much of that money should be shared with the people who are creating the content that YouTube is profiting from.

Monetization is the process of making money off of a product or service, that otherwise wouldn’t provide an income. Some bloggers monetize by selling ad space in their sidebar. People pay a fee for a month or two and have their site mentioned in a post, and do a giveaway, ect. YouTube is a for-profit company, of course they’re allowed to monetize and make money off of their efforts, but the service would be useless without the creators who draw people in.

The best way to make money is to figure out the best part of your business and find a way to get people to pay for it. What matters on YouTube*? Views and comments. Those are the interactions that both creators and consumers of videos get the most out of. They may not be the most profitable interactions, but they are the reasons people want to be a part of the YouTube community.

How can YouTube make a profit off these? To be honest, I’m not sure what the answer is. Advertising may be part of it, and certainly will be for the foreseeable future, but I can’t help but think that a more engaging form of advertising will eventually be thought up.

Meanwhile, YouTube as a company, seems to have decided that Subscriptions are the be all end all of video making. Here’s the thing: YouTube can provide the space, but if they want to grow as a platform they can’t dictate how people use it. In fact, the more freedom they give, the more likely people are to use their service in a way that brings in more viewers and – ultimately – more money for the site.

There are two things that can be achieved by introducing paid subscriptions.

Thing the first: no advertising. I can especially see the value of this in kids content. If I was a parent I would be willing to pay for a kids content channel, knowing that I could let my kids watch it without worrying about raunchy advertisements.  Peace of mind is absolutely worth $5-10 a month.

Thing the second: A requirement that paid subscription channels be high quality and consistent. If I was guaranteed an awesome video once or twice a week I could understand a subscription fee. Web series come to mind such as the Lizzie Bennett Diaries or Crash Course. Channels where I know I am getting consistently awesome content are channels I would be happy to pay for.

But the majority of content on YouTube is made by people who are not relying on said content as their source of income. People who make videos for fun, who got an account to upload that one video of their cat on a romba chasing a duck. In an internet climate where the only way to get noticed is through big cross-platform social media campaigns, what is YouTube doing to draw the general population of viewers and creators? Not much.

Do you YouTube?  What kinds of channels would you be willing to pay subscription fees for?

*to those who are creating YouTube videos

YouTube, Advertisements, and Generation C

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Lately there’s been a lot of buzz about the influence that YouTube has on the rest of mainstream media.  As everything is changing so rapidly networks are fighting for viewers right next to cable networks.  Premium cable networks are fighting with new online content put out by other subscription services.  Somewhere in there, YouTube is holding it’s own.  In fact, it could easily be argued that YouTube is winning.

In order to better understand where YouTube stands, I want to give a brief outline of house these other companies make money.  As much as I am interested more in the creative aspect, having an understanding of the financial makes me more aware of the industry as a future creator and helps viewers to have a better understanding of why these corporations makes choices in the way they do.

Network television includes the “big 4” networks, CBS, ABC, Fox, and NBC.  If you include The CW it’s 5.  If you have the right kind of TV, these stations are free to pluck out of the airwaves.  Legally they must provide news coverage along with entertainment.  They make their money from advertising revenue, AKA commercials.

The next step up is basic cable.  These are networks like TNT, TBS, and USA that create original content to run next to syndicated repeats of network shows, as well as 24-hour news channels like CNN and MSNBC.  Whatever your niche is, you can probably find it on basic cable.  These channels are scrambled in the airwaves and you have to pay a cable company a subscription fee to give you a box to unscramble it.  These companies make money two ways, through the subscription fee as well as through advertising revenue.

Beyond that are premium cable channels and subscription services.  These are considered separate entities by some, but they turn a profit in the same way.  They include HBO and AMC, and Netflix, Hulu Plus, and Amazon Prime.  These services run solely on subscription fees and are broadcast through scrambled airwaves, digital boxes like a Roku or Apple TV, or through online streaming.

Then comes YouTube.  While there are a few other video hosting sites, Vimeo and Yahoo! Screen come to mind, YouTube holds the market share.  YouTube is viable only through advertising revenue which include sidebar ads (that run along the bottom and sides of web pages), lower third ads (that pop up along the bottom of a video), and pre-rolls (commercials that run before a video will play).  The difference here is in the content.

While TV networks and subscription services create their own content or pay syndication fees to run older shows made by other studios or networks, YouTube content is made by individuals and uploaded to the site directly.  This leads to lots of videos of cats and stupid human tricks, but also has allowed for a new type of content to emerge.

Web content falls under a handful of categories and, in a similar style to basic cable, anything you want, you can find it online.  What I’d guess to be the most regular and consistent content is vlogs (video blogs), how to videos, and web shows.

In the case of any of these you can easily subscribe to a channel (the term used for a YouTube creator).  Once you’ve subscribed, their videos will show up in your subscriptions list and you can follow their comments and likes on other videos.

To me, and clearly to thousands of others, what makes web content great is the community it creates.  By following a how to channel I have a group of people I can go to if I have questions.  By following a vlogger and commenting on their videos I start to become a part of their online community.  By following web shows and interacting with other fans in the comments we create a whole new experience of fandom.  Down the line this leads to things like VidCon and other meet ups where fans can meet the creators.

Creators of web content are more accessible to what’s starting to be called Generation C (“C” stands for community).  While sometimes described by year, Generation C is defined more by their way of interacting with each other online.  Generation C is made possible by YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr.  The platforms they use to stay connect to each other across city, state, country, continents, and oceans have shaped their existence and these habits are being cemented into popular culture.  Get ready, because it’s not going away.

Are you a member of Generation C?  What type of media gets your eyeballs?

I Ship It

Oh fandom, how I love thee.

By the time I realized that ‘shipper was short for relation-shipper I was already in too deep.  I probably got sucked into fandom around the age of twelve or thirteen.  In retrospect, I was much too young to be there, but there I was anyway.  It started with CSI, then House, NCIS, and all the procedurals.  I watched for the characters, and stayed through the changes.  Ships may come and go, but shipping itself is forever.

A note: some of these contradict each other.  I don’t care.  I ship it.  Shipping is not rational, it is completely based on my whims, and this is how I feel damn it.

Books
Harry/Ginny – Harry Potter
Luna/Neville – Harry Potter
Jessica/Marcus – Jessica Darling Series
Nancy/Ned – Nancy Drew
Nancy/Frank – Nancy Drew
Mary/Bert – Mary Poppins

Movies
Jack/Elizabeth – Pirates of the Caribbean
Jack/Rum – Pirates of the Caribbean
Jack/Jar of Dirt – Pirates of the Caribbean
Captain/Maria – The Sound of Music
Rapunzel/Flynn Rider – Tangled
Tarzan/Jane – Tarzan
Jessie/Buzz – Toy Story
Tony Stark/Pepper Potts – Iron Man

Television
Josh/Donna – The West Wing
CJ/Toby – The West Wing
CJ/Danny – The West Wing
Donna/Sam – The West Wing
Gabby – NCIS
Tiva – NCIS
Harm/Mac – JAG
Chuck/Sarah – Chuck
Nine/Rose – Doctor Who
Rose/TenToo – Doctor Who
Eleven/Idris – Doctor Who
Two/Jamie – Doctor Who
Liz/Bailey – The Good Guys
Casey/Dana – Sports Night
Jeremey/Natalie – Sports Night
Spuffy – Buffy the Vampire Slayer
Willow/Tara – Buffy the Vampire Slayer
Angel/Cordelia – Angel
Fred/Westley – Angel
Victor/Pria – Dollhouse
Topher/Adelle – Dollhouse
Sybill/Branson – Downton Abbey
Anna/Mr. Bates – Downton Abbey
Snow/Charming – Once Upon A Time
Cora/Rumple – Once Upon A Time
Emma/Hook – Once Upon A Time
Leslie/Ben – Parks and Rec
Parker/Elliot – Leverage
Sophie/Elliot – Leverage
Parker/Nate – Leverage

Mini-series
Glitch/DG – Tin Man
Alice/Hatter – Alice

Web
Penny/Billie – Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog
Cheeks/Brady – Husbands
Dizzie – The Lizzie Bennett Diaries
Cereal Guy/Faux Fur Girl – Hipsterhood
Jack/Mitchelle – The Outs

Of Musical Stories

Music has been a passion of mine since I was an infant.  More specifically, singing.  I sing pretty much all the freaking time.  Ask anyone who’s ever been around me for more than ten minutes.  When I was in middle school I started taking voice lessons and continued through high school.  I stopped when I went to college because I didn’t know how to find a place, but may try to start again sometime because it’s a blast.

Because of this background I am most well versed in Broadway, leading to this: a list of musicals that I know backwards and forwards till the end of time.  I’ll warn you that this list may have gotten a little out of hand.  Or a lot.  What can I say?  I’m sorry I’m not sorry.

  1. The Sound of Music is my all time favorite movie.  Still.  The story is timeless and true, the music is beautiful, and Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer are perfect.  I sometimes daydream about the dance in the movie being a part of my wedding.
  2. Les Miserables.  I was so excited when I heard they were going to turn this into a movie.  So excited.  I learned a few of these songs over the years in voice lessons, but truly learned the soundtrack after having seen it right before it went off Broadway in New York.
  3. Hairspray was my first Broadway show.  That might be a lie, but it was certainly one of the most memorable.  My aunt took me to see it for Christmas one year and I catch myself singing the songs every once and a while.  Sometimes you just gotta Run An’ Tell That.
  4. RENT.  Oh the controversy.  I was not allowed to watch this when the movie came out, but learned most of the soundtrack through friends.  We would sing it during our lunch period and memories pieces to perform for each other.
  5. Wicked is wicked good (I’m also a fan of bad puns).  I’ve been to see this three times and had fantastic seats every time.  Such a great show.
  6. The Wizard of Oz will forever be one of my favorite childhood stories.  At one point I had an audio tape of the movie and would play it on repeat.  I’m not actually sure that this counts as a proper musical, but there is plenty of singing in it, so I’ll go ahead and add it to the list.
  7. Mary Poppins.  I watch/listen to the 1964 Julie Andrews movie version and this was another favorite of my childhood.
  8. Across the Universe is another may not count one, but I know the Across the universe version of most of the songs better than I know the Beatles version, sorry to say.  So here it is on the list.
  9. Once Upon A Mattress was my high school’s musical when I was a junior.  It was a blast.  I missed the auditions, so I was a chorus member, but it was so much fun I didn’t even mind.
  10. Anything Goes was another high school production, but done the year after I left.  I somehow wound up with a burned CD of the music though and can sing along to most of it.  I also saw the more recent Broadway version when it was in San Francisco a few months ago, and that version made me want to take tap.  One day.
  11. Dr. Horrible’s Sing Along Blog is being counted because Joss Whedon.
  12. Once More With Feeling (Buffy musical episode) is also being counted.  See above reason.

Honorable Mention (I know a few songs, but would be overshooting to claim the entire show): Oliver!, Phantom of the Opera, The Music Man, anything Disney (because there’s too many to count properly), Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, Bye Bye Birdie, White Christmas, Splendora, Chicago, West Side Story, Cabaret, Doctor Doolittle, You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown, Fiddler on the Roof, Grease, Annie, Little Shop of Horrors, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Enchanted, and Sweeney Todd.

What are your favorite musicals?  Do you randomly burst into song?

My Year in Television

I considered a summary of just the season so far (starting in August/September/October), but realized that since I’ve been going on about the new format that television has taken of not having a strict season, I figured it would be more with the times to do an overview of the whole year.  This one may be a bit long, so I apologize in advance.

I started the year in a downtown apartment with glorious cable access including BBC America, and all the cable channels a girl could ever dream of.  My roommate and I would record everything on out DVR and then watch shows together.  Comedies like Modern Family, and The Middle; New Girl and Psych.

Watching things together made sure that I was caught up with everything that was going on in the world of sitcoms and dramadies.  We also watched all the BBC shows we could manage to record.  Doctor Who and The Hour being two of my favorites.  I would also watch anything with Chef Gordon Ramsey (and still will) which for the winter slump mostly includes Ramsey’s Kitchen Nightmares.

When my shows started up again I watched Once Upon A Time, Fringe, and Chuck, which I had caught up with again for it’s final season.  A bit into the semester I watched Downton Abbey as it premiered as PBS’s masterpiece series, loving every minute of it.

In fact, I loved it so much that I incorporated it into a ten page paper about how historical fiction is more a reflection of our times than the times it portrays  using Downton Abbey as a case study.  In another class I worked on a Once Upon A Time spec script that will likely never see more than my parent’s living room.  I got an A, and my mom displays it proudly, but the material was outdated as soon as I was finished with the outline.

Through school I was introduced to Husbands the Series, season one of which I gobbled up in a few hours.  As Chuck ended I turned to web series such as Husbands and The Lizzie Bennet Diaries to keep me afloat before finals season struck.

When it did I was awash in emotion.  Saddness over Sherlock, questions for Fringe and Once, shock over NCIS which i had only watched a handful of episodes of all season.

Once the shock wore off I dove into summer television with a vengeance.  The full arsenal of Ramsey shows were family entertainment.  MasterChef, Hell’s Kitchen, Ramsey’s Kitchen Nightmares, and the new Hotel Hell.  I also powered through the final season of Buffy the Vamipre Slayer, finishing what wound up being a nearly ten year watching in progress.  I had a lot to say about it.  Yeah.

Meanwhile, a friend gave me a call asking me if I was free to be somebody’s coffee bitch in LA.  Let me check m–YES.  The experience not only gave me a chance to talk with some awesome people, it also gave me a whole list of things to watch as the summer continued.

But there was no time for that as I began a period of travel induced, television watching stasis.  While I watched no TV for nearly seven weeks I did manage to catch the Opening Ceremony of the Olympics in Berlin, and then the closing two weeks later in Rome.  The trip also included breaking into Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog and Once More, With Feeling songs often, which was quite amusing to Germans who only understood half the words I sang.

Upon my return I set myself up with very basic cable (without recording!) and settled in for premiere season.  In the process I accidentally watched the summer finale for Leverage while waiting for the premieres of Fringe and Once Upon A Time.  I tried a handful of new shows including 666 Park Avenue, Revolution, Last Resort, and Elementary, but Elementary was the only one that stuck.  I haven’t missed an episode.

I trooped over to a friends building to watch Doctor Who and try out Copper (didn’t stick, but I plan to try again).  I waited patiently for Community to return (still waiting).  I worked through Angel quickly with minimal emotional breakdown and sat down loyally to watch my three loyal shows (Once, Elementary, and Fringe) live due to lack of recording.  Awesome.

As the year ends I am beginning a regemene of British shows and random mini series.  I watched Neverland in a weekend, and have Luther, Copper, The Hour, Downton, and a few others on my list (any suggestions?).  Granted I seem to be ignoring the list for a borrowed copy of Band of Brothers and Lost Girl on Netflix.  Hmm.  This year has been filled with wonderful television and I couldn’t be more excited to see what 2013 has to bring.